Now you see it, now you don't: Evidence for age-dependent and age-independent cross-modal distraction

M.J.S. Guerreiro, P.W.M. van Gerven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Age-related deficits in selective attention have often been demonstrated in the visual modality and, to a lesser extent, in the auditory modality. In contrast, a mounting body of evidence has suggested that cross-modal selective attention is intact in aging, especially in visual tasks that require ignoring the auditory modality. Our goal in this study was to investigate age-related differences in the ability to ignore cross-modal auditory and visual distraction and to assess the role of cognitive control demands thereby. In a set of two experiments, 30 young (mean age = 23.3 years) and 30 older adults (mean age = 67.7 years) performed a visual and an auditory n-back task (0

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-426
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • aging
  • selective attention
  • cross-modal distraction
  • inhibition
  • sensory modality
  • EVENT-RELATED POTENTIALS
  • WORKING-MEMORY CAPACITY
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • IRRELEVANT-SPEECH
  • SIMON TASK
  • FIGURAL TRANSFORMATIONS
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • INHIBITORY PROCESSES
  • ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • HEALTHY YOUNGER

Cite this