Monitoring global volume-related hemodynamic or regional variables after initial resuscitation: What is a better predictor of outcome in critically ill septic patients?

M. Poeze, B.C. Solberg, J.W.M. Greve, G. Ramsay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Regional variables of organ dysfunction are thought to be better monitoring variables than global pressure-related hemodynamic variables. Whether a difference exists between regional and global volume-related variables in critically ill patients after resuscitation is unknown. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic test evaluation. SETTING: University-affiliated mixed intensive care unit. PATIENTS: Twenty-eight critically ill patients. INTERVENTIONS: Using standardized resuscitation, hemodynamic optimization was targeted at mean arterial pressure, heart rate, occlusion pressure, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, and urine output. Primary outcome variable was in-hospital mortality. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During resuscitation, global volume-related hemodynamic variables were measured simultaneously and compared with regional variables. At admission no variable was superior as a predictor of outcome. During resuscitation, significant changes were seen in mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, oxygen delivery, systemic vascular resistance, total blood volume, right heart and ventricle end-diastolic volume, right ventricle ejection fraction, right and left stroke work index, intramucosal carbon dioxide pressure, gastric mucosal pH, mucosal-end tidal Pco2 gap, indocyanine green blood clearance, indocyanine green plasma clearance, and plasma disappearance rate. Multivariate analysis identified lactate, gastric mucosal pH, mucosal-end tidal Pco2 gap, mucosal-arterial Pco2 gap, indocyanine green plasma clearance, and plasma disappearance rate of dye as nondependent predictors of outcome. Patients who subsequently died had a significantly lower gastric mucosal pH, higher intramucosal carbon dioxide pressure and mucosal-end tidal Pco2 gap, and lower indocyanine green blood clearance, indocyanine green plasma clearance, plasma disappearance rate, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume index, of which gastric mucosal pH, mucosal-end tidal Pco2 gap, and indocyanine green blood clearance were the most important predictors of outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Initial resuscitation of critically ill patients with shock does not require monitoring of regional variables. After stabilization, however, regional variables are the best predictors of outcome
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2494-2500
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2005

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