Modifiable patient-related factors associated with pressure ulcers on the sacrum and heels: Secondary data analyses

Benedicte Manderlier, Nele Van Damme, Sofie Verhaeghe, Ann Van Hecke, Irma Everink, Ruud Halfens, Dimitri Beeckman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Aim To explore factors associated with the presence of category I-IV pressure ulcers on the sacrum and heels. Design Cross-sectional, secondary data analysis using data collected from the Landelijke Prevalentiemeting Zorgproblemen (LPZ) project, a multicentre prevalence study including nursing home residents and community care clients (N = 4,842) in the Netherlands in 2017. Methods A single binary logistic regression model was designed to identify factors associated with the presence of pressure ulcers. Additionally, a multiple binary logistic regression model including modifiable explanatory factors associated with the presence of pressure ulcers was designed. Results Impaired mobility, friction and shear (evaluated using the Braden Scale) are significantly associated with the presence of both sacral and heel category I-IV pressure ulcers. Incontinence-associated dermatitis is significantly associated with category I-IV sacral pressure ulcers. Conclusion In pressure ulcer prevention, nursing interventions should focus on frequent repositioning and mobilization while avoiding exposure of the skin to friction and shear. The need to consider incontinence-associated dermatitis, incontinence and moisture as important factors in pressure ulcer risk assessment is confirmed. Impact Pressure ulcers occur when skin and tissues are deformed between bony prominences and the support surface in a sitting or lying position. They are the result of a complex interaction between direct causal factors and a wide range of indirect factors. Recognition of these factors influences risk assessment guidance and practice. Knowledge of skin-specific factors at the patient level, modifiable by nursing interventions, enables a better targeted and tailored preventive approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2773-2785
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Volume75
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • associated factor
  • heel
  • modifiable
  • nurses
  • nursing
  • pressure ulcers
  • risk assessment
  • sacrum
  • INCONTINENCE-ASSOCIATED DERMATITIS
  • INTERNATIONAL PREVALENCE MEASUREMENT
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • MALNUTRITION PREVALENCE
  • CLASSIFICATION-SYSTEM
  • NURSING-HOMES
  • CARE PROBLEMS
  • BRADEN SCALE
  • RELIABILITY
  • PREVENTION

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