Minority paradoxes: Ethnic differences in self-reported offending and official crime statistics

A. Leerkes, R. Martinez, P. Groeneveld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Immigrants and their native-born children tend to be overrepresented among crime suspects in Europe. Using a representative Dutch survey, we examine whether inhabitants of Turkish and Moroccan origin also self-report more crimes than the native Dutch. In addition, we test various explanations for ethnic differences in crime, partly using variables that are unavailable in administrative data (socio-economic status [SES], perceived discrimination, neighbourhood disadvantage and control, family bonds, religiousness). We discover two 'minority paradoxes'. Firstly, contrary to analyses using administrative data, both minorities have similar to lower self-reported crime rates compared to the majority group when age, sex, urbanization, SES and social desirability are controlled. Secondly, first-generation immigrants report fewer crimes than expected given their social disadvantage, thus indicating a notable 'righteous migrant effect.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-187
Number of pages22
JournalBritish Journal of Criminology
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

JEL classifications

  • j15 - "Economics of Minorities, Races, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination"

Keywords

  • Assimilation
  • Ethnic minorities
  • Immigration
  • Law enforcement
  • Self-reported crime
  • immigration
  • IMMIGRANT
  • STATE
  • ASSIMILATION
  • ethnic minorities
  • self-reported crime
  • assimilation
  • STRAIN THEORY
  • DISCRIMINATION
  • NETHERLANDS
  • law enforcement
  • 2ND-GENERATION

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