Metropolitan governance and environmental outcomes: Does inter-municipal cooperation make a difference?

Victor Osei Kwadwo*, T. Skripka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We develop a three-level mixed-effects linear model to conduct a systematic large-n study testing the impact of cooperation in transportation on CO2 transport emissions. We use a novel dataset covering over 200 metropolitan areas in 16 OECD countries. The findings demonstrate that both fragmented and consolidated metropolitan governance structures are equally inefficient in delivering a reduction in CO2 transport emissions. Further, without functional enforcement mechanisms, mitigation policies fail to have a positive effect on environmental outcomes. Inter-municipal cooperation in metropolitan areas facilitates coherence and widespread enforcement and emerges as a crucial factor explaining the reduction of CO2 transport emissions. Effects of metropolitan cooperation on transportation are magnified by the presence of national environmental mitigation policies.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalLocal Government Studies
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2021

JEL classifications

  • l38 - Public Policy
  • o44 - Environment and Growth
  • q50 - Environmental Economics: General

Keywords

  • Metropolitan areas
  • inter-municipal cooperation
  • CO2 transport emissions
  • OECD
  • environmental outcomes
  • CO2 EMISSIONS
  • INTERMUNICIPAL COOPERATION
  • CLIMATE-CHANGE
  • FUEL TOURISM
  • TRANSPORTATION
  • DECOMPOSITION
  • GOVERNMENT
  • EFFICIENCY
  • REDUCTION
  • DELIVERY

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