Mentalization and Psychosis: A Rationale for the Use of Mentalization Theory to Understand and Treat Non-affective Psychotic Disorder

J. G. Weijers*, C. ten Kate, M. Debbane, A. W. Bateman, S. de Jong, J-P C. J. Selten, E. H. M. Eurelings-Bontekoe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Social functioning can be severely impaired in non-affective psychotic disorder (NAPD). Current models of psychosis pathogenesis do not tend to focus on social dysfunction and pharmacological treatment fails to ameliorate it. In this article, we propose that mentalization theory provides a valuable contribution to the understanding and treatment of NAPD. Impaired mentalizing may contribute to both positive and negatives symptoms as well as social dysfunction observed in NAPD. Furthermore, impaired mentalizing may help explain the relation between childhood abuse, insecure attachment and psychosis. Mentalization based treatment may contribute to the functional recovery of NAPD patients as it targets the social cognitive processes underlying social interaction. The article includes a description of the principles of MBT in general, specific characteristics of using MBT with patients with NAPD and a clinical vignette to illustrate these principles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-232
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Contemporary Psychotherapy
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Psychosis
  • Schizophrenia
  • Attachment theory
  • Mentalizing
  • Epistemic trust
  • Mentalization based treatment
  • BORDERLINE PERSONALITY-DISORDER
  • SERIOUS MENTAL-ILLNESS
  • EARLY INTERVENTION
  • ADULT ATTACHMENT
  • SOCIAL COGNITION
  • EPISTEMIC TRUST
  • HIGH-RISK
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • RECOVERY
  • SELF

Cite this