Memory detection 2.0: the first web-based memory detection test

B. Kleinberg, B. Verschuere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

There is accumulating evidence that reaction times (RTs) can be used to detect recognition of critical (e.g., crime) information. A limitation of this research base is its reliance upon small samples (average n = 24), and indications of publication bias. To advance RT-based memory detection, we report upon the development of the first web-based memory detection test. Participants in this research (Study1: n = 255; Study2: n = 262) tried to hide 2 high salient (birthday, country of origin) and 2 low salient (favourite colour, favourite animal) autobiographical details. RTs allowed to detect concealed autobiographical information, and this, as predicted, more successfully so than error rates, and for high salient than for low salient items. While much remains to be learned, memory detection 2.0 seems to offer an interesting new platform to efficiently and validly conduct RT-based memory detection research.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0118715
Number of pages17
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2015

Keywords

  • GUILTY KNOWLEDGE TEST
  • CONCEALED INFORMATION
  • SKIN-CONDUCTANCE
  • MECHANICAL TURK
  • DATA-COLLECTION
  • TIME MEASURES
  • VALIDITY
  • PSYCHOLOGY
  • PROBE

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