May I have your attention, please? : A neuroscientific study into message attention for health information

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisInternal

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Abstract

Realizing behaviour changes through health information is a difficult and complex task. This complexity is partly due to the way that people process health information. Aim of the research was to gain more insight into the underlying action mechanisms of various forms of health information, such as personally relevant and threatening health information. Attention processes for these two different messages were studied by measuring brain activity (EEG and fMRI), eye movements and reaction times during the processing of the information. The conclusion is that personally relevant health information can raise the attention, whereas presenting threatening health information can evoke defensive reactions.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Maastricht University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Kok, Gerjo, Supervisor
  • Ruiter, Rob, Advisor
  • van de Ven, Vincent, Advisor
Award date19 Nov 2010
Place of PublicationMaastricht
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789052789767
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

Keywords

  • health information
  • method
  • information processing
  • attention

Cite this

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May I have your attention, please? : A neuroscientific study into message attention for health information. / Kessels, L.

Maastricht : Maastricht University, 2010. 143 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisInternal

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AB - Realizing behaviour changes through health information is a difficult and complex task. This complexity is partly due to the way that people process health information. Aim of the research was to gain more insight into the underlying action mechanisms of various forms of health information, such as personally relevant and threatening health information. Attention processes for these two different messages were studied by measuring brain activity (EEG and fMRI), eye movements and reaction times during the processing of the information. The conclusion is that personally relevant health information can raise the attention, whereas presenting threatening health information can evoke defensive reactions.

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KW - information processing

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