Maintenance of a Physically Active Lifestyle After Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients With COPD: A Qualitative Study Toward Motivational Factors

K. Stewart, J.J. Meis, C. van de Bool, D.J. Janssen, S.P. Kremers, A.M. Schols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To explore determinants of behavior change maintenance of a physically active lifestyle in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 8-11 months after completion of a 4-month outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study of semistructured interviews. SETTING: Pulmonary rehabilitation assessment center. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with COPD. MEASUREMENTS: Semistructured interviews until data saturation, coded by 2 independent researchers. Patients were classified as responder (maintenance or improvement) or nonresponder (relapse or decrease), based on 3 quantitative variables reflecting exercise capacity (Constant Work Rate Test), health-related quality of life (Short-Form health survey [SF-36]), and self-management abilities (Self-Management Ability Scale [SMAS-30/Version 2]). RESULTS: Mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) among interviewees was 52.5% (14.4%) predicted and the mean age was 63.5 years (range: 45-78). The group consisted of 15 responders and 7 nonresponders. Physical limitations reduced competence to engage in an active lifestyle and responders appeared to experience higher levels of perceived competence. Social support was found important and the experienced understanding from fellow patients made exercising together enjoyable. Particularly, responders expressed autonomous motivation and said they exercised because of the benefits they gain from it. Unexpectedly, only responders also experienced controlled motivation. CONCLUSION: Perceived competence and autonomous motivation are important determinants for maintenance of an active lifestyle in patients with COPD. In contrast to common theoretical assumptions, a certain threshold level of controlled motivation may remain important in maintaining a physically active lifestyle after a pulmonary rehabilitation program.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-664
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • pulmonary rehabilitation
  • behavior maintenance
  • autonomous motivation
  • SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY
  • OF-LIFE
  • IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE
  • EXERCISE PROGRAMS
  • DISEASE
  • PERSPECTIVE
  • EFFICACY
  • OUTCOMES
  • DYSPNEA
  • PEOPLE

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