Long-Term Effects of Radioiodine Treatment on Female Fertility in Survivors of Childhood Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

Marloes Nies, Astrid E. P. Cantineau, Eus G. J. M. Arts, Marleen H. van den Berg, Flora E. van Leeuwen, Anneke C. Muller Kobold, Marielle S. Klein Hesselink, Johannes G. M. Burgerhof, Adrienne H. Brouwers, Eveline W. C. M. van Dam, Bas Havekes, Marry M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Eleonora P. M. Corssmit, Leontien C. M. Kremer, Romana T. Netea-Maier, Helena J. H. van der Pal, Robin P. Peeters, John T. M. Plukker, Cecile M. Ronckers, Hanneke M. van SantenAnouk N. A. van der Horst-Schrivers, Wim J. E. Tissing, Gianni Bocca, Eline van Dulmen-den Broeder, Thera P. Links*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background: Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) during childhood is a rare disease. Its excellent survival rate requires a focus on possible long-term adverse effects. This study aimed to evaluate fertility in female survivors of childhood DTC by assessing various reproductive characteristics combined with anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels (a marker of ovarian reserve).

Methods: Female survivors of childhood DTC, diagnosed at

Conclusions: Female survivors of DTC who received I-131 treatment during childhood do not appear to have major abnormalities in reproductive characteristics nor in predictors of ovarian failure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1169-1176
Number of pages8
JournalThyroid
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • differentiated thyroid carcinoma
  • childhood cancer
  • adverse effects
  • fertility
  • radioiodine
  • ANTI-MULLERIAN HORMONE
  • RADIOACTIVE IODINE ABLATION
  • OVARIAN RESERVE
  • I-131 THERAPY
  • ANTIMULLERIAN HORMONE
  • CANCER
  • PREGNANCY
  • CHILDREN
  • WOMEN
  • AMH

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