Long-term effectiveness and moderators of a web-based tailored intervention for cancer survivors on social and emotional functioning, depression, and fatigue: randomized controlled trial

Roy A. Willems*, Ilse Mesters, Lilian Lechner, Iris M. Kanera, Catherine A. W. Bolman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

32 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The web-based computer-tailored Kanker Nazorg Wijzer (Cancer Aftercare Guide) supports cancer survivors with psychosocial issues during cancer recovery. The current study investigates whether the 6-month effects in increasing emotional and social functioning and reducing depression and fatigue hold at 12 months from baseline. Moreover, it explores whether patient characteristics moderate the 6- and 12-month intervention effectiveness.

Cancer survivors from 21 Dutch hospitals (November 2013-June 2014) were randomized to an intervention (n = 231) or a wait-list control group (n = 231). Intervention effects on emotional and social functioning (EORTC QLQ-C30), depression (HADS), and fatigue (CIS) were evaluated through multilevel linear regression analyses.

At 12 months from baseline, the intervention group no longer differed from the control group in emotional and social functioning, depression, and fatigue. Moderator analyses indicated that, at 6 months, the intervention was effective in improving social functioning for men (d = 0.34), reducing fatigue for participants ae56 years (d = 0.44), and reducing depression for participants who received chemotherapy (d = 0.36). At 12 months, participants with a medium educational level reported higher social functioning (d = 0.19), while participants with a low educational level reported lower social functioning (d = 0.22) than participants with a similar educational level in the control group.

The intervention gave cancer patients a head start to psychological recovery after the end of cancer treatment. The control group caught up in the long run.

The Cancer Aftercare Guide expedited recovery after cancer treatment. Being a low intensity, easy accessible, and relatively low cost intervention, it could serve as a relevant step in recovery and stepped care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-703
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship-Research and Practice
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Psycho-oncology
  • Survivorship
  • RCT
  • eHealth
  • Computer tailoring
  • Self-management
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • SELF-MANAGEMENT
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • LUNG-CANCER
  • NECK-CANCER
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
  • INTERNET USE
  • STYLE
  • SCALE

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