Locking and loading the bullet against micro-calcification

Alexandru Florea, Agnieszka Morgenroth, Jan Bucerius, Leon J. Schurgers, Felix M. Mottaghy*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Web of Science)
20 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aims

Despite recent medical advances, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. As (micro)-calcification is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, this review will elaborately discuss advantages of sodium fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) as a reliable cardiovascular imaging technique for identifying the early onset of vascular calcification (i.e. locking onto the target). We assess state-of-the-art meta-analysis and clinical studies of possible treatment options and evaluate the concept of vitamin K supplementation to preserve vascular health (i.e. loading the bullet).

Methods and results

After a structured PubMed search, we identified F-18-sodium fluoride (F-18-NaF) PET as the most suitable technique for detecting micro-calcification. Presenting the pros and cons of available treatments, vitamin K supplementation should be considered as a possible safe and cost-effective option to inhibit vascular (micro)-calcification.

Conclusion

This review demonstrates need for more extensive research in the concept of vitamin K supplementation (i.e. loading the bullet) and recommends monitoring the effects on vascular calcification using F-18-NaF PET (i.e. locking onto the target).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1370-1375
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume28
Issue number12
Early online date2 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Vascular calcification
  • CAC score
  • CT
  • F-18-NaF PET
  • vitamin K
  • CORONARY-ARTERY CALCIUM
  • VITAMIN-K SUPPLEMENTATION
  • VASCULAR CALCIFICATION
  • MENAQUINONE-7 SUPPLEMENTATION
  • POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
  • MATRIX VESICLES
  • ATHEROSCLEROSIS
  • MECHANISMS
  • DISEASE
  • RISK

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