Lifestyle interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour in clinical populations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of different strategies and effects on cardiometabolic health

Ine Nieste*, Wouter M. A. Franssen, Jan Spaas, Liesbeth Bruckers, Hans H. C. M. Savelberg, Bert O. Eijnde

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

8 Citations (Web of Science)
215 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cardiometabolic comorbidities are highly prevalent in clinical populations, and have been associated (partly) with their sedentary lifestyle. Although lifestyle interventions targeting sedentary behaviour (SB) have been studied extensively in the general population, the effect of such strategies in clinical populations is not yet clear. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effect of different lifestyle interventions on SB and cardiometabolic health in clinical populations.

Randomised controlled trials were collected from five bibliographic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus). Studies were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated a lifestyle intervention to reduce objectively measured SB, in comparison with a control intervention among persons with a clinical condition. Data were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis.

In total, 7094 studies were identified. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were categorised in five population groups: overweight/obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, neurological/cognitive and musculoskeletal diseases. Participants reduced their SB by 64 min/day (95%CI: [-91, -38] min/day; p < 0.001), with larger within-group differences of multicomponent behavioural interventions including motivational counselling, self-monitoring, social facilitation and technologies (-89 min/day; 95%CI: [-132, -46] min/day; p < 0.001). Blood glycated haemoglobin concentration (-0.17%; 95% CI: [-0.30, -0.04]%; p = 0.01), fat percentage (-0.66%; 95% CI: [-1.26, -0.06]%, p = 0.03) and waist circumference (-1.52 cm; 95%CI: [-2.84, -0.21] cm; p = 0.02) were significantly reduced in the intervention groups compared to control groups.

Behavioural lifestyle interventions reduce SB among clinical populations and improve cardiometabolic risk markers such as waist circumference, fat percentage, and glycaemic control.

Sedentary behaviour, Cardiometabolic health, Clinical populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106593
Number of pages16
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • MEASURED PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • SITTING TIME
  • RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS
  • WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE
  • PERCEIVED BARRIERS
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • ADULTS
  • EXERCISE
  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • OBESITY

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