Lifestyle, Diet, and Colorectal Cancer Risk According to (Epi)genetic Instability: Current Evidence and Future Directions of Molecular Pathological Epidemiology

Laura A. E. Hughes, Colinda C. J. M. Simons, Piet A. van den Brandt, Manon van Engeland, Matty P. Weijenberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

66 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Purpose of Review In this review, we describe molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) studies from around the world that have studied diet and/or lifestyle factors in relation to molecular markers of (epi) genetic pathways in colorectal cancer (CRC), and explore future perspectives in this realm of research. The main focus of this review is diet and lifestyle factors for which there is evidence for an association with CRC as identified by the World Cancer Research Fund reports. In addition, we review promising hypotheses, that warrant consideration in future studies.

Recent Findings Associations between molecular characteristics of CRC have been published in relation to smoking, alcohol consumption; body mass index (BMI); waist: hip ratio; adult attained height; physical activity; early life energy restriction; dietary acrylamide, fiber, fat, methyl donors, omega 3 fatty acids; meat, including total protein, processed meat, and heme iron; and fruit and vegetable intake.

Summary MPE studies help identify where associations between diet, lifestyle, and CRC risk may otherwise be masked and also shed light on how timing of exposure can influence etiology. Sample size is often an issue, but this may be addressed in the future by pooling data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-469
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Colorectal Cancer Reports
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Molecular pathological epidemiology
  • Diet
  • Lifestyle
  • Review
  • ISLAND METHYLATOR PHENOTYPE
  • SPORADIC COLON CARCINOMAS
  • KRAS MUTATION STATUS
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • MICROSATELLITE INSTABILITY
  • CIGARETTE-SMOKING
  • PROMOTER METHYLATION
  • RECTAL-CANCER
  • APC MUTATIONS
  • NETHERLANDS COHORT

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