Lifelong physical activity in maintaining bone strength in older men and women of the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study

N. J. Rianon*, T.F. Lang, G. Sigurdsson, G. Eiriksdottir, S. Sigurdsson, M. Garcia, S. Pajala, A. Koster, B. Yu, B. J. Selwyn, W. C. Taylor, A. S. Kapadia, V. Gudnason, Lenore J. Launer, Tamara B. Harris

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

We examined if lifelong physical activity is important for maintaining bone strength in the elderly. Associations of quantitative computerized tomography-acquired bone measures (vertebral and femoral) and self-reported physical activity in mid-life (mean age, 50?years), in old age (?65?years), and throughout life (recalled during old age) were investigated in 2,110 men and 2,682 women in the AGES-Reykjavik Study. Results conclude lifelong physical activity with continuation into old age (?65?years) best maintains better bone health later in life.Skeletal loading is thought to modulate the loss of bone in later life, and physical activity is a chief means of affecting bone strength by skeletal loading. Despite much discussion regarding lifelong versus early adulthood physical activity for preventing bone loss later in life, inconsistency still exists regarding how to maintain bone mass later in life (?65?years).We examined if lifelong physical activity is important for maintaining bone strength in the elderly.The associations of quantitative computerized tomography-acquired vertebral and femoral bone measures and self-reported physical activity in mid-life (mean age, 50?years), in old age (?65?years), and throughout life (recalled during old age) were investigated in 2,110 men and 2,682 women in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.Our findings conclude that lifelong physical activity with continuation into old age (?65?years) best maintains better bone health in the elderly.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2303-2312
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • AGES-Reykjavik Study
  • Bone mineral density
  • Older men and women
  • Osteoporosis
  • Physical activity
  • QCT bone measures

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