Language policy and the disengagement o the international academic elite

John Harbord*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

This paper explores the phenomena of academic multiliteracy (the habit of writing academically in more than one language) and of L2 monoliteracy (that of only writing academically in a language that is not one's own) and their impact on policy. Based on interviews and surveys conducted with 33 multiliterate and 15 L2 monoliterate scholars connected to one university in Central Europe between 2010 and 2014, I show how incentives to publish in English constructed by educational policies often push ambitious young researchers whose first language is not English away from engaging in academic and societal debates in their first language community. They may thus disengage from the national community, with negative consequences for the interaction between global and local that is essential for good governance. To overcome the difficulty young scholars encounter in writing in their native languages, they should be taught writing both in their native language and in English. Furthermore, university and state policies should reward scholars for writing not only for the international community but also for local society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalScience Editing
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Language
  • Motivation
  • Publishing
  • Research personnel
  • Reward
  • ENGLISH
  • PUBLICATION

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