Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK

A.E.A. Elsayed, A. de Grip, D. Fouarge

Research output: Working paperProfessional

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Abstract

Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty. However, the lower part-time pay penalty is also related to lower wage returns to reading and writing which are performed more intensively by full-time workers. Conversely, the increasing returns to influencing has increased the part-time pay penalty despite the convergence in the influencing task input between part-time and full-time workers. The relative changes in the input and prices of computer use and job tasks together explain more than 50 percent of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationMaastricht
PublisherMaastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Cite this

Elsayed, A. E. A., de Grip, A., & Fouarge, D. (2014). Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK. Maastricht: Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics.
Elsayed, A.E.A. ; de Grip, A. ; Fouarge, D. / Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK. Maastricht : Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics, 2014.
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Elsayed, AEA, de Grip, A & Fouarge, D 2014 'Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK' Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics, Maastricht.

Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK. / Elsayed, A.E.A.; de Grip, A.; Fouarge, D.

Maastricht : Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics, 2014.

Research output: Working paperProfessional

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Elsayed AEA, de Grip A, Fouarge D. Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK. Maastricht: Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics. 2014 Jan 1.