Job insecurity and employee health: The buffering potential of job control and job self-efficacy

B.H.J. Schreurs, H. van Emmerik, G. Notelaers, H. de Witte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the direct and moderating effects of two types of control that employees have over the work situation - job control and job self-efficacy - on the relationship between job insecurity and employee health. The authors hypothesize that job control and job self-efficacy attenuate the negative effects of job insecurity on both a short-term (i.e. need for recovery) and a long-term health outcome (i.e. impaired general health). These hypotheses were examined using survey data collected from a heterogeneous sample of 1368 Belgian workers. Results of moderated regression analysis showed that job control, but not job self-efficacy, buffered the negative effects of job insecurity on employee health. We conclude that organizations can temper the negative health effects of job insecurity by giving their employees more control over their work.

Original languageEnglish
Article number920603551
Pages (from-to)56-72
Number of pages17
JournalWork and Stress
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

Keywords

  • job demands
  • insecurity
  • self-efficacy
  • autonomy
  • work stress
  • work motivation
  • recovery
  • control
  • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
  • WHITEHALL-II
  • PROSPECTIVE COHORT
  • LONGITUDINAL TEST
  • REPORTED HEALTH
  • MODERATING ROLE
  • CONTROL MODEL
  • RATED HEALTH
  • WORK STRESS
  • STRAIN

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