"It was a lot tougher than I thought it would be": A qualitative study on the changing nature of being a hemophilia carrier

Charlotte von der Lippe, Jan Frich, Anna Harris, Kari Solbrække

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Studies on carriers of genetic disorders mainly focus on the process of genetic testing and reproductive choices, and less on how psychosocial aspects of being a carrier change over time. Our study sought to understand more about the psychosocial aspects of hemophilia carrier status, and thereby improve counseling aiming to advance carriers' quality of life and well-being. We analyzed 16 in-depth interviews from women who were carriers of hemophilia and had a son with hemophilia. Three themes emerged: Guilt and sorrow across generations; the choices and future consequences of genetic testing; and preparing to have a child with hemophilia. Experience with being a hemophilia carrier is a process that changes over time while feelings of guilt and sorrow run across generations. The carrier status may create "mothers-in-waiting" living at risk of having a sick child or not. The women think they are prepared to have a son with hemophilia, but experience more sadness than they expect when a son is diagnosed. Our findings suggest that health professionals, especially clinical geneticists and genetic counselors, carriers, families and patient organizations need to be aware that women's experiences of being a carrier of hemophilia changes during the biographical life course. The women may benefit from several rounds of genetic counseling at different stages of life.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1324-1332
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Genetic Counseling
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • ATTITUDES
  • COMMUNICATION
  • Carrier
  • DISEASE
  • EXPERIENCES
  • Experiences
  • FAMILIES
  • Hemophilia A
  • Hemophilia B
  • IMPACT
  • MOTHERS
  • PARENTS
  • PRENATAL-DIAGNOSIS
  • Psychosocial
  • Qualitative
  • REPRODUCTIVE CHOICES

Cite this

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abstract = "Studies on carriers of genetic disorders mainly focus on the process of genetic testing and reproductive choices, and less on how psychosocial aspects of being a carrier change over time. Our study sought to understand more about the psychosocial aspects of hemophilia carrier status, and thereby improve counseling aiming to advance carriers' quality of life and well-being. We analyzed 16 in-depth interviews from women who were carriers of hemophilia and had a son with hemophilia. Three themes emerged: Guilt and sorrow across generations; the choices and future consequences of genetic testing; and preparing to have a child with hemophilia. Experience with being a hemophilia carrier is a process that changes over time while feelings of guilt and sorrow run across generations. The carrier status may create {"}mothers-in-waiting{"} living at risk of having a sick child or not. The women think they are prepared to have a son with hemophilia, but experience more sadness than they expect when a son is diagnosed. Our findings suggest that health professionals, especially clinical geneticists and genetic counselors, carriers, families and patient organizations need to be aware that women's experiences of being a carrier of hemophilia changes during the biographical life course. The women may benefit from several rounds of genetic counseling at different stages of life.",
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"It was a lot tougher than I thought it would be" : A qualitative study on the changing nature of being a hemophilia carrier. / von der Lippe, Charlotte; Frich, Jan; Harris, Anna; Solbrække, Kari.

In: Journal of Genetic Counseling, Vol. 26, No. 6, 12.2017, p. 1324-1332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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