Is it cost-effective to provide internet-based interventions to complement the current provision of smoking cessation services in the Netherlands? An analysis based on the EQUIPTMOD

Kei-Long Cheung*, Ben F. M. Wijnen, Mickael Hiligsmann, Kathryn Coyle, Doug Coyle, Subhash Pokhrel, Hein de Vries, Maximilian Prager, Silvia M. A. A. Evers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background and aim The cost-effectiveness of internet-based smoking cessation interventions is difficult to determine when they are provided as a complement to current smoking cessation services. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of such an alternate package compared with existing smoking cessation services alone (current package). Methods A literature search was conducted to identify internet-based smoking cessation interventions in the Netherlands. A meta-analysis was then performed to determine the pooled effectiveness of a (web-based) computer-tailored intervention. The mean cost of implementing internet based interventions was calculated using available information, while intervention reach was sourced from an English study. We used EQUIPTMOD, a Markov-based state-transition model, to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios [expressed as cost per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained] for different time horizons to assess the value of providing internet-based interventions to complement the current package.). Deterministic sensitivity analyses tested the uncertainty around intervention costs per smoker, relative risks, and the intervention reach. Results Internet-based interventions had an estimated pooled relative risk of 1.40; average costs per smoker of (sic)2.71; and a reach of 0.41% of all smokers. The alternate package (i.e. provision of internet-based intervention to the current package) was dominant (cost-saving) compared with the current package alone (0.14 QALY gained per 1000 smokers; reduced health-care costs of (sic)602.91 per 1000 smokers for the life-time horizon). The alternate package remained dominant in all sensitivity analyses. Conclusion Providing internet-based smoking cessation interventions to complement the current provision of smoking cessation services could be a cost-saving policy option in the Netherlands.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-95
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume113
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Economic evaluation
  • EQUIPTMOD
  • internet-based
  • model
  • smoking cessation
  • tobacco
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • PROGRAM
  • PRODUCTIVITY
  • PREVENTION
  • PROTOCOL
  • BEHAVIOR
  • EXAMPLE
  • PHONE
  • CARE

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