Intestinal barrier function in morbid obesity: results of a prospective study on the effect of sleeve gastrectomy

Jennifer Wilbrink*, Nienke Bernards, Zlatan Mujagic, Mark van Avesaat, Kirsten Pijls, Tim Klaassen, Hans van Eijk, Simon Nienhuijs, Arnold Stronkhorst, Ellen Wilms, Freddy Troost, Ad Masclee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background Obesity has been associated with impaired intestinal barrier function. It is not known whether bariatric surgery leads to changes in intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that obesity is associated with disturbances in gastrointestinal barrier function, and that after bariatric surgery barrier function will improve. Methods Prospective single center study in which we assessed segmental gut permeability by urinary recovery of a multisugar drink in 27 morbidly obese (BMI 43.3 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) and 27 age and gender matched lean subjects (BMI 22.9 +/- 0.43 kg/m(2)). Fecal calprotectin, SCFAs, plasma cytokines, and hsCRP were assessed as inflammatory and metabolic markers. Comparisons: (a) morbidly obese subjects vs. controls and (b) 2 and 6 months postsleeve vs. presleeve gastrectomy (n = 14). In another group of 10 morbidly obese and 11 matched lean subjects colonic and ileal biopsies were obtained in order to measure gene transcription of tight junction proteins. Results Gastroduodenal permeability (urinary sucrose recovery) was significantly increased in obese vs. lean controls (p <0.05). Small intestinal and colonic permeability (urinary recovery of lactulose/L-rhamnose and sucralose/erythritol, respectively) in obese subjects were not significantly different from controls. Morbidly obese subjects had a proinflammatory systemic and intestinal profile compared with lean subjects. After sleeve gastrectomy BMI decreased significantly (p <0.001). Postsleeve gastroduodenal permeability normalized to values that do not differ from lean controls. Conclusions Gastroduodenal permeability, but not small intestinal or colonic permeability, is significantly increased in morbidly obese patients. After sleeve gastrectomy, gastroduodenal permeability normalized to values in the range of lean controls. Thus, the proximal gastrointestinal barrier is compromised in morbid obesity and is associated with a proinflammatory intestinal and systemic profile.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)368-376
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • GASTRIC BYPASS
  • FECAL CALPROTECTIN
  • BARIATRIC SURGERY
  • GUT PERMEABILITY
  • WEIGHT-LOSS
  • INFLAMMATION
  • OVERWEIGHT
  • DISEASE
  • ABSORPTION
  • MICROBIOTA

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