Interstitial lung damage due to cocaine abuse: pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics and therapy.

M. Drent, P. Wijnen, A. Bast

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Medicinal agents, beside occupational and environmental agents, remain one of the most common causes for interstitial lung diseases (ILD). A major problem with ILD is the recognition of the causative agent. In some cases more or less characteristic features of presentation are described. Often, the connection between drug-use and the development of related inflammatory damage or idiosyncratic toxicities is hard to recognize and objectify. Cocaine, a xenobiotic and the most commonly used illicit drug, causes serious medical and social problems. An increasing incidence of lung toxicity related to cocaine or crack-use is being reported worldwide. However, the mechanism of the resulting lung injury is not fully understood. This review summarizes possible molecular mechanisms explaining intra-individual variability in cocaine response and lung toxicity. The importance of including pharmacogenomics in the work-up of patients with suspected drug-induced lung toxicity is highlighted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5607-5611
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Medicinal Chemistry
Volume19
Issue number33
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • Cocaine
  • crack
  • CYP450
  • drug-induced toxicity
  • interstitial lung diseases
  • polymorphisms
  • oxidative stress
  • redox cycling
  • nitroxide radicals
  • cocaine metabolites
  • biotransformation
  • OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE
  • OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE
  • CHEMICAL TOXICITY
  • CYTOCHROMES P450
  • METABOLISM
  • DRUGS
  • CRACK
  • VKORC1
  • ANTICOAGULATION

Cite this