International radiation oncology trainee decision making in the management of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

Kristopher Dennis, Liying Zhang, Stephen Lutz, Yvette van der Linden, Angela van Baardwijk, Tanya Holt, Jean-Leon Lagrange, Palmira Foro-Arnalot, Lea-Choung Wong, Ernesto Maranzano, Kam-Hung Wong, Rico Liu, Vassilios Vassiliou, Benjamin W. Corn, Carlo De Angelis, Lori Holden, C. Shun Wong, Edward Chow*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

This study explored international radiation oncology trainee decision making in the management of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (RINV). Radiation oncology trainees who were members of the national radiation oncology associations of the USA, Canada, Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand, France, Spain and Singapore completed a Web-based survey. Respondents estimated the risks of nausea and vomiting associated with six standardised radiotherapy-only clinical case vignettes modelled after international anti-emetic guidelines and then committed to prophylactic, rescue or no therapy as an initial management approach for each case. One hundred and seventy-six trainees from 11 countries responded. Only 28 % were aware of any anti-emetic guideline. In general, risk estimates and management approaches for the high-risk and minimal risk cases varied less and were more in line with guideline standards than were estimates and approaches for the moderate- and low-risk cases. Prophylactic therapy was the most common approach for the high-risk and a moderate-risk case (83 and 71 % of respondents respectively), while rescue therapy was the most common approach for a second moderate-risk case (69 %), two low-risk cases (69 and 76 %) and a minimal risk case (68 %). A serotonin receptor antagonist was the most commonly recommended prophylactic agent. On multivariate analysis, a higher estimated risk of nausea predicted for recommending prophylactic therapy, and a lower estimated risk of nausea predicted for recommending rescue therapy. Radiation oncology trainee risk estimates and recommended management approaches for RINV clinical case vignettes varied and matched guideline standards more often for high-risk and minimal risk cases than for moderate- and low-risk cases. Risk estimates of nausea specifically were strong predictors of management decisions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2041-2048
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • Anti-emetic
  • Emesis
  • Nausea
  • Radiotherapy
  • Trainee
  • Vomiting

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