Incidence of subsequent fractures in the UK between 1990 and 2012 among individuals 50years or older

R. Y. van der Velde, C. E. Wyers, P. P. M. M. Geusens, J. P. W. van den Bergh, F. de Vries, C. Cooper*, T. P. van de Staa, N. C. Harvey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

aSummaryWe studied the incidence of subsequent fractures in persons of 50+years from 1990 to 2012 and the relative risk (RR) of subsequent fractures after an index femur/hip fracture, stratified per 5-year age band. Patients suffering a fracture have a high incidence of a subsequent fracture; the RR of subsequent fracture after a femur/hip fracture ranged from 2 to 7.IntroductionRecent information on the risk of subsequent fractures after a broad range of index fractures in the UK population is scarce. We therefore studied the rates of subsequent fractures of the femur/hip, humerus, radius/ulna, vertebrae, rib, or pelvis after fractures at one of these sites from 1990 to 2012 in 3,156,347 UK men and women aged 50years or over.MethodsWe undertook a retrospective observational study using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The incidence of subsequent fractures at a specific site was calculated by dividing the observed number of fractures by the number of person-years (py) at risk. The relative risk (RR) of subsequent fractures after a femur/hip fracture, by 5-year age band, was calculated by dividing the incidence of a specific subsequent fracture type by the incidence of first fractures at the same site in the same age group.ResultsThe highest subsequent fracture incidence after a femur/hip fracture was for humerus fracture in men (59.5/10.000py) and radius/ulna fracture in women (117.2/10.000py). After an index fracture of the radius/ulna, humerus fracture in men (59.3/10.000py) and femur/hip fracture in women (82.4 per 10.000py) were most frequent. The RR of fractures after a femur/hip fracture ranged from 2 to 7 and were highest in men and younger age groups.ConclusionPatients suffering a fracture have a high incidence of a subsequent fracture. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fracture prevention in patients with a history of a fracture by adequate medical diagnosis and treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2469-2475
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Fracture incidence
  • Osteoporosis
  • Subsequent fractures
  • PRACTICE RESEARCH DATABASE
  • POPULATION-BASED COHORT
  • HIP FRACTURE
  • FRAGILITY FRACTURES
  • OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURES
  • VERTEBRAL FRACTURE
  • ELDERLY-WOMEN
  • DATA RESOURCE
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • RISK
  • Recurrence
  • Age Distribution
  • Humans
  • Middle Aged
  • Male
  • Femoral Fractures/epidemiology
  • Incidence
  • Female
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Assessment/methods
  • Osteoporotic Fractures/epidemiology
  • Databases, Factual
  • United Kingdom/epidemiology
  • Hip Fractures/epidemiology
  • Aged

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