Impact of obesity on postoperative complications after laparoscopic and open incisional hernia repair - A prospective cohort study

Patrick Hamid Alizai*, Anne Andert, Eric Lelaona, Ulf Peter Neumann, Christian Daniel Klink, Marc Jansen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background: Obese patients are often required to lose weight prior to incisional hernia repair as obesity is thought to increase postoperative complications and recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of BMI on the outcome after laparoscopic and open incisional hernia repair.

Materials and methods: In a cohort study from May 2012 to August 2016, 178 patients underwent incisional hernia repair: 90 patients open SUBLAY and 88 patients laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM). Patients' characteristics, hernia size and postoperative complications were prospectively recorded. Patients were divided into two groups according to their weight: non-obese (BMI <30 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI >= 30 kg/m(2)). In October 2016, eligible patients were assessed for recurrence.

Results: 109 patients (61%) were non-obese; 69 patients (39%) were obese. Morbidity rate was higher among obese patients without reaching statistical significance (35% versus 22%; p = 0.083). BMI had no impact on length of hospital stay. The mean duration of surgery was significantly longer for patients with a BMI = 30 kg/m2 (82 min versus 98 min; p = 0.026). Duration of surgery in particular was significantly longer for obese patients that underwent open SUBLAY repair (p = 0.001). 119 patients (67%) were available for follow-up. Recurrence rates also showed no significant difference between both groups (7% versus 8%, p = 0.856).

Conclusion: Morbidity rate following incisional hernia repair is not significantly higher in obese than in non-obese patients. BMI has no significant impact on the recurrence rate. Laparoscopic IPOM could be beneficial for obese patients with regard to duration of surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-224
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Surgery
Volume48
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Incisional hernia
  • IPOM
  • Sublay
  • Hernia repair
  • BMI
  • Obesity
  • RANDOMIZED-CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • VENTRAL HERNIAS
  • GASTRIC BYPASS
  • COMPOSITE MESH
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • CLASSIFICATION
  • OVERWEIGHT
  • OUTCOMES

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