Impact of laparoscopic antireflux surgery on belching in pediatric GERD patients

N. F. Rinsma*, Arisja Mauritz, L. W. E. van Heurn, C. E. J. Sloots, P. D. Siersema, R. H. J. Houwen, D. C. van der Zee, A. A. M. Masclee, J. M. Conchillo, M. Y. A. Van Herwaarden-Lindeboom

*Corresponding author for this work

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4 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background Laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) is a well-established treatment option for children with proton pomp inhibitor (PPI)-resistant gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Besides preventing reflux of gastric fluid and solid content, LARS may also impair the ability of the stomach to vent intragastric air (i.e. gastric belching) and induce gas-related complications, such as bloating and/or hyperflatulence. Furthermore, it was previously hypothesized that LARS induces a behavioral type of belching, not originating from the stomach, called supragastric belching. The aim of this study was to objectively evaluate the impact of LARS on gastric (GB) and supragastric belching (SGB) in children with GERD. MethodsWe performed a prospective, Dutch multicenter cohort study including 25 patients (12 males, median age 6 (range 2-18) years) with PPI-resistant GERD who were scheduled for LARS. Twenty-four-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance pH monitoring (MII-pH monitoring) was performed before and 3 months after fundoplication. Impedance pH tracings were analyzed for reflux episodes and GBs and SGBs. Key ResultsLARS reduced acid exposure time from 8.5% (6.0-16.2%) to 0.8% (0.2-2.8%), p <0.001. The number of GBs also significantly decreased after LARS (59 [43-77] VS 5 [2-12], p <0.001). The number of air swallows remained unchanged after LARS. SGBs were infrequent before LARS with no change in the number of SGB observed after the procedure. Postoperative belching symptoms were associated with GBs, not with SGBs. Conclusion & InferencesLARS significantly reduces the number of GBs in children with GERD, whereas the number of air swallows remains unchanged. Postoperative symptomatic belching is associated with GBs, but not with SGBs. These findings suggest that LARS does not induce the occurrence of SGBs in children, but longer follow-up is required.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1525-1532
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Keywords

  • belching
  • gas
  • gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • laparoscopic fundoplication
  • pediatrics

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