How Learning to Read Changes the Listening Brain

Linda Romanovska*, Milene Bonte*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Reading acquisition reorganizes existing brain networks for speech and visual processing to form novel audio-visual language representations. This requires substantial cortical plasticity that is reflected in changes in brain activation and functional as well as structural connectivity between brain areas. The extent to which a child's brain can accommodate these changes may underlie the high variability in reading outcome in both typical and dyslexic readers. In this review, we focus on reading-induced functional changes of the dorsal speech network in particular and discuss how its reciprocal interactions with the ventral reading network contributes to reading outcome. We discuss how the dynamic and intertwined development of both reading networks may be best captured by approaching reading from a skill learning perspective, using audio-visual learning paradigms and longitudinal designs to follow neuro-behavioral changes while children's reading skills unfold.

Original languageEnglish
Article number726882
Number of pages16
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Dec 2021

Keywords

  • ATTENTION SPAN DEFICIT
  • AUDIOVISUAL INTEGRATION
  • DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
  • FAMILIAL RISK
  • PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
  • PLANUM TEMPORALE ASYMMETRY
  • SPEECH-PERCEPTION
  • VISUAL-ATTENTION
  • WHITE-MATTER
  • WORD FORM AREA
  • audio-visual plasticity
  • dorsal and ventral reading networks
  • dyslexia
  • reading development
  • reading-induced plasticity

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