Holistic face categorization in higher order visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: toward a non-hierarchical view of face perception

B. Rossion, L. Dricot, R. Goebel, T. Busigny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (two-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo's facelike paintings). Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus ("Fusiform face area") and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no "occipital face area"). This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.
Original languageEnglish
Article number225
Number of pages30
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume4
Issue number225
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • face perception
  • visual cortex
  • Mooney
  • fusiform gyrus
  • prosopagnosia
  • FFA
  • VENTRAL TEMPORAL CORTEX
  • MONKEY INFEROTEMPORAL CORTEX
  • OBJECT-PROCESSING STAGES
  • MIDDLE FUSIFORM GYRUS
  • ACQUIRED PROSOPAGNOSIA
  • INDIVIDUAL FACES
  • HEMISPHERIC-SPECIALIZATION
  • FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY
  • SPATIAL-RESOLUTION
  • SELECTIVE CORTEX

Cite this

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title = "Holistic face categorization in higher order visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: toward a non-hierarchical view of face perception",
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author = "B. Rossion and L. Dricot and R. Goebel and T. Busigny",
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Holistic face categorization in higher order visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: toward a non-hierarchical view of face perception. / Rossion, B.; Dricot, L.; Goebel, R.; Busigny, T.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 4, No. 225, 225, 10.01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Holistic face categorization in higher order visual areas of the normal and prosopagnosic brain: toward a non-hierarchical view of face perception

AU - Rossion, B.

AU - Dricot, L.

AU - Goebel, R.

AU - Busigny, T.

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N2 - How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (two-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo's facelike paintings). Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus ("Fusiform face area") and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no "occipital face area"). This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.

AB - How a visual stimulus is initially categorized as a face in a network of human brain areas remains largely unclear. Hierarchical neuro-computational models of face perception assume that the visual stimulus is first decomposed in local parts in lower order visual areas. These parts would then be combined into a global representation in higher order face-sensitive areas of the occipito-temporal cortex. Here we tested this view in fMRI with visual stimuli that are categorized as faces based on their global configuration rather than their local parts (two-tones Mooney figures and Arcimboldo's facelike paintings). Compared to the same inverted visual stimuli that are not categorized as faces, these stimuli activated the right middle fusiform gyrus ("Fusiform face area") and superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), with no significant activation in the posteriorly located inferior occipital gyrus (i.e., no "occipital face area"). This observation is strengthened by behavioral and neural evidence for normal face categorization of these stimuli in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient whose intact right middle fusiform gyrus and superior temporal sulcus are devoid of any potential face-sensitive inputs from the lesioned right inferior occipital cortex. Together, these observations indicate that face-preferential activation may emerge in higher order visual areas of the right hemisphere without any face-preferential inputs from lower order visual areas, supporting a non-hierarchical view of face perception in the visual cortex.

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KW - visual cortex

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KW - MONKEY INFEROTEMPORAL CORTEX

KW - OBJECT-PROCESSING STAGES

KW - MIDDLE FUSIFORM GYRUS

KW - ACQUIRED PROSOPAGNOSIA

KW - INDIVIDUAL FACES

KW - HEMISPHERIC-SPECIALIZATION

KW - FUNCTIONAL NEUROANATOMY

KW - SPATIAL-RESOLUTION

KW - SELECTIVE CORTEX

U2 - 10.3389/fnhum.2010.00225

DO - 10.3389/fnhum.2010.00225

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5161

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M1 - 225

ER -