Global versus task-specific postoperative feedback in surgical procedure learning

T. Nazari*, K. Bogomolova, M. Ridderbos, M.E.W. Dankbaar, J.J.G. van Merrienboer, J.F. Lange, T. Wiggers, J.A. van der Hage

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background: Task-specific checklists and global rating scales are both recommended assessment tools to provide constructive feedback on surgical performance. This study evaluated the most effective feedback tool by comparing the effects of the Observational Clinical Human Reliability Analysis (OCHRA) and the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) on surgical performance in relation to the visual-spatial ability of the learners. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, medical students were allocated to either the OCHRA (n = 25) or OSATS (n = 25) feedback group. Visual-spatial ability was measured by a Mental Rotation Test. Participants performed an open inguinal hernia repair procedure on a simulation model twice. Feedback was provided after the first procedure. Improvement in performance was evaluated blindly using a global rating scale (performance score) and hand-motion analysis (time and path length). Results: Mean improvement in performance score was not significantly different between the OCHRA and OSATS feedback groups (P = .100). However, mean improvement in time (371.0 +/- 223.4 vs 274.6 +/- 341.6; P = .027) and path length (53.5 +/- 42.4 vs 34.7 +/- 39.0; P = .046) was significantly greater in the OCHRA feedback group. When stratified by mental rotation test scores, the greater improvement in time (P = .032) and path length (P = .053) was observed only among individuals with low visual-spatial abilities. Conclusion: A task-specific (OCHRA) feedback is more effective in improving surgical skills in terms of time and path length in novices compared to a global rating scale (OSATS). The effects of a task-specific feedback are present mostly in individuals with lower visual-spatial abilities. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery
Volume170
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED ASSESSMENT
  • VISUAL-SPATIAL ABILITY
  • RELIABILITY-ANALYSIS OCHRA
  • TECHNICAL SKILLS OSATS
  • MEDICAL-STUDENTS
  • MOTION
  • SURGERY
  • PERFORMANCE
  • TRACKING
  • INSTRUCTION

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