Gene therapy for bone engineering

Elizabeth Rosado Balmayor, Martijn van Griensven*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Bone has an intrinsic healing capacity that may be exceeded when the fracture gap is too big or unstable. In that moment, osteogenic measures need to be taken by physicians. It is important to combine cells, scaffolds and growth factors, and the correct mechanical conditions. Growth factors are clinically administered as recombinant proteins. They are, however, expensive and needed in high supraphysiological doses. Moreover, their half-life is short when administered to the fracture. Therefore, gene therapy may be an alternative. Cells can constantly produce the protein of interest in the correct folding, with the physiological glycosylation and in the needed amounts. Genes can be delivered in vivo or ex vivo by viral or non-viral methods. Adenovirus is mostly used. For the non-viral methods, hydrogels and recently sonoporation seem to be promising means. This review will give an overview of recent advancements in gene therapy approaches for bone regeneration strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9
JournalFrontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Cite this