Forgetting of prior remembering in persons reporting recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse

E.G. Geraerts, M. Arnold, D. Lindsay, H.L.G.J. Merckelbach, M. Jelicic, B.J.A. Hauer

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24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Case studies of individuals reporting recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse suggest that some overestimate their prior forgetting of the abuse. People reporting recovered or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse and control subjects reporting no history of abuse participated in two experiments examining this 'forgot it all along" phenomenon. Participants in Experiment 1 were more likely to forget that they had previously recalled a studied item if they were cited to think of it differently on two recall tests than if they were cued to think of it in the same way on. the two tests. This effect was stronger for recovered-memory participants than for continuous-memory and control participants. In Experiment 2, participants recalled autobiographical events three times over a period of 4 months. Much as in Experiment 1, they underestimated prior remembering when. the events had been recalled in a different emotional frame (Positive vs. negative) on the previous occasion. This underestimation was more pronounced for recovered-memory participants than, for continuous-memory and control participants.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1002-1008
JournalPsychological Science
Volume17
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2006

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