Feedback strategies to raise awareness of personal dietary intake: results of a randomized controlled trial

A. Oenema, J. Brug

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Feedback strategies to raise awareness of personal dietary intake: results of a randomized controlled trial.

Oenema A, Brug J.

Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. a.oenema@gvo.unimaas.nl

BACKGROUND: Feedback is a strategy that can be used to influence awareness of dietary habits. Feedback was applied in an interactive computer-tailored intervention and in printed self-test forms. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with a 3 (study groups) x 2 (higher vs. medium or lower educational level) design was conducted. Adult subjects (N = 304) were randomly assigned to a feedback group or the control group. Immediate impact on realism of self-rated intake levels of fat, fruit, and vegetables were tested, as were intentions to change. RESULTS: Self-rated fat intake compared to others was more realistic among respondents with a medium or lower educational level in the tailored intervention group. Self-rated fruit intake compared to others was more realistic in the tailored intervention group. Self-rated fat intake was more realistic in the tailored intervention than the self-test group. Intention to reduce fat consumption was greater in the tailored intervention group. Intention to eat more vegetables was greater in the tailored than in the self-test group. Subjects rated the tailored intervention as more effective, more personally relevant, more individualized, and providing more new information. CONCLUSIONS: Only the tailored intervention had an immediate impact on awareness and dietary change intention and was appreciated better than both other interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-439
Number of pages10
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003

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