Exploring the relation between learning style and cognitive impairment in patients with acquired brain injury

H. Boosman, J.M.A. Visser-Meily, M.W.M. Post, E. Lindeman, C.M. van Heugten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The way a patient prefers to approach or choose a learning situation represents the patient's learning style. The objective of this chart review study was to explore the relation between learning style and cognitive impairment in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). We used data from files of 92 adult patients with ABI referred to inpatient rehabilitation, who completed the Adapted Learning Style Inventory (A-LSI) and at least one of the following neuropsychological tests: Trail Making Test, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, WAIS-III Digit Span, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test-Copy, Stroop Color-Word Test, or the Brixton Spatial Anticipation Test. The A-LSI yielded the following distribution of learning styles: 4 doers, 48 observers, 2 deciders and 38 thinkers. No significant correlation coefficients were found between the neuropsychological tests and the A-LSI. Furthermore, Chi-square tests revealed no significant associations between learning style (observer, thinker) and cognitive impairment. The results of this exploratory study suggest that learning style and cognitive impairment are independent in patients with ABI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-39
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Cite this