European Parliament elections in times of (delayed) Brexit

Research output: Non-textual formWeb publication/siteProfessional

Abstract

At the time of writing, we are nearing the third anniversary of the Brexit referendum of 23 June 2016. While a cause for celebration or a grave feeling of loss, depending on where you stand on the issue, it almost feels like nothing much has happened since. In fact, while Brexit originally was to happen on 29 March of this year, British politicians have been unable to reach agreement on what that Brexit should look like. As a result, Brexit has been postponed, most recently until the end of October 2019.

After many ‘meaningful’ votes (oh, the irony…) we are now in a situation in which British citizens are asked to vote during the upcoming European Parliament (EP) elections of 23-26 May 2019, something that both the British government and the European Union (EU) wanted to avoid. What might this development hold for the EP elections?
Original languageEnglish
PublisherDCU Brexit Institute
Media of outputBlog
Publication statusPublished - 21 May 2019

Keywords

  • European Studies
  • European elections
  • brexit

Cite this

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title = "European Parliament elections in times of (delayed) Brexit",
abstract = "At the time of writing, we are nearing the third anniversary of the Brexit referendum of 23 June 2016. While a cause for celebration or a grave feeling of loss, depending on where you stand on the issue, it almost feels like nothing much has happened since. In fact, while Brexit originally was to happen on 29 March of this year, British politicians have been unable to reach agreement on what that Brexit should look like. As a result, Brexit has been postponed, most recently until the end of October 2019.After many ‘meaningful’ votes (oh, the irony…) we are now in a situation in which British citizens are asked to vote during the upcoming European Parliament (EP) elections of 23-26 May 2019, something that both the British government and the European Union (EU) wanted to avoid. What might this development hold for the EP elections?",
keywords = "European Studies, European elections, brexit",
author = "Patrick Bijsmans",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "21",
language = "English",
publisher = "DCU Brexit Institute",
address = "Ireland",

}

Bijsmans, P, European Parliament elections in times of (delayed) Brexit, 2019, Web publication/site, DCU Brexit Institute.
European Parliament elections in times of (delayed) Brexit. Bijsmans, Patrick (Author). 2019. DCU Brexit Institute.

Research output: Non-textual formWeb publication/siteProfessional

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AB - At the time of writing, we are nearing the third anniversary of the Brexit referendum of 23 June 2016. While a cause for celebration or a grave feeling of loss, depending on where you stand on the issue, it almost feels like nothing much has happened since. In fact, while Brexit originally was to happen on 29 March of this year, British politicians have been unable to reach agreement on what that Brexit should look like. As a result, Brexit has been postponed, most recently until the end of October 2019.After many ‘meaningful’ votes (oh, the irony…) we are now in a situation in which British citizens are asked to vote during the upcoming European Parliament (EP) elections of 23-26 May 2019, something that both the British government and the European Union (EU) wanted to avoid. What might this development hold for the EP elections?

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