Ethnic differences in intergenerational solidarity in the Netherlands

J.M.D. Schans, A. Komte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Using data from the 2002-2003 Netherlands Kinship Panel Study and the Social Position and Provisions Ethnic Minorities Survey (N=2833) we describe patterns of intergenerational solidarity among five different ethnic groups in the Netherlands. We compare patterns of normative, associational and functional solidarity between various immigrant groups and the native Dutch, and question how and to what extent behavior is determined by filial norms, socio-demographic position or ethnic background. Results show that immigrant adult children show higher levels of normative (filial obligations) and associational (contact) solidarity. Functional solidarity (providing support) shows a more complex pattern. Immigrants are no more likely to provide counsel or advice than the Dutch but immigrant women are more likely to provide practical support than Dutch women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-203
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Aging Studies
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Keywords

  • ADULT CHILDREN
  • AGING PARENTS
  • AMERICAN FAMILIES
  • BLACKS
  • EXCHANGES
  • FILIAL RESPONSIBILITY
  • GENDER
  • OLDER PARENTS
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • WHITES

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