Emotional, cognitive and physiological correlates of abuse-related stress in borderline and antisocial personality disorder

J. Lobbestael, A.R. Arntz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood abuse is an important precursor of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The current study compared the emotional reactivity to abuse-related stress of these patients on a direct and an indirect level. Changes in self-reported affect and schema modes, psychophysiology and reaction time based cognitive associations were assessed following confrontation with an abuse-related film fragment in patients with BPD (n = 45), ASPD (n = 21), Cluster C personality disorder (n = 46) and non-patient controls (n = 36). Results indicated a hyperresponsivity of BPD-patients on self-reported negative affect and schema modes, on some psychophysiological indices and on implicit cognitive associations. The ASPD-group was comparable to the BPD group on implicit cognitions but did not show self-reported and physiological hyper-reactivity. These findings suggest that BPD and ASPD-patients are alike in their implicit cognitive abuse-related stress reactivity, but can be differentiated in their self-reported and physiological response patterns. 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-124
Number of pages9
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Abuse-related stress induction
  • Traumatic stimuli
  • Direct assessment
  • Schema modes
  • Indirect assessment
  • Psychophysiology
  • Emotional reactivity
  • SC-IAT
  • IMPLICIT ASSOCIATION TEST
  • CHILDHOOD MALTREATMENT
  • PSYCHOPATHY
  • ABANDONMENT
  • REACTIVITY
  • DIAGNOSES
  • MEMORIES

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