EMDR as a Treatment Approach of PTSD Complicated by Comorbid Psychiatric, Somatic, and Cognitive Disorders: A Case Report of an Older Woman With a Borderline and Avoidant Personality Disorder

Ellen M. J. Gielkens*, Sjacko Sobczak, Gina Rossi, Erlene Rosowsky, S. J. P. van Alphen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Traumatic life events can result in severe psychiatric conditions among which posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the most prevalent. Due to high comorbidity with other psychiatric diagnoses, PTSD treatment is challenging. In older adults, the presentation of PTSD symptoms is especially complicated because of even higher comorbidity, higher rates with other mental disorders, and cognitive and somatic conditions. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an evidence-based treatment for trauma in younger adults. There is limited empirical research on the treatment effects of EMDR in older adults. Moreover, the impact of successful EMDR treatment on the comorbid disorders, especially personality and cognitive dysfunctions, is unclear. In this case report, EMDR treatment effects for late-onset PTSD with comorbid borderline and avoidant personality disorders, as well as cognitive disorders and multiple somatic problems, will be presented in an older woman.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-347
Number of pages20
JournalClinical Case Studies
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Keywords

  • older adults
  • PTSD
  • complex PTSD
  • personality disorder
  • EMDR
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • EYE-MOVEMENT DESENSITIZATION
  • DSM-IV DISORDERS
  • BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
  • SURVEY REPLICATION
  • ANXIETY DISORDERS
  • SEVERITY INDEXES
  • ADULTS
  • PREVALENCE
  • PSYCHOTHERAPY

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