EFFECTS OF HIV/AIDS ON CHILDREN'S EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

Tatenda P. Zinyemba*, Milena Pavlova, Wim Groot

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Over the last three decades, 35 million people have died of AIDS. As a result, HIV/AIDS has brought about a significant reduction in human capital, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have examined the effects of HIV/AIDS on human capital, in particular educational attainment. These studies have examined different countries, datasets, and educational outcomes. This systematic literature review provides a comprehensive up-to-date overview of peer-reviewed papers published in English by focusing on the main mechanisms that influence the effects of HIV/AIDS on educational outcomes. These are sickness of the child, orphanhood, and sickness of parents. The results show that educational outcomes of HIV-infected children, AIDS orphans, and children with HIV-infected parents are affected differently. HIV-infected children mainly miss school days due to illness and medical appointments, and orphans mainly face financial problems and lack motivation in their education, while children with HIV-infected parents may have to take care of their sick parents or face financial problems that affect their education. Distinguishing these groups of children could help to formulate policies that adequately improve schooling outcomes of these vulnerable children.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-84
Number of pages50
JournalJournal of Economic Surveys
Volume34
Issue number1
Early online date22 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • children
  • education
  • HIV
  • AIDS
  • human capital investment
  • intergenerational transmission
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE
  • HIV-INFECTED PARENTS
  • GLOBAL BURDEN
  • SOUTH-AFRICA
  • VULNERABLE CHILDREN
  • AIDS ORPHANS
  • AFFECTED COMMUNITIES
  • SCHOOL ATTENDANCE
  • AFFECTED FAMILIES

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