Effect of Anesthesia on Microelectrode Recordings During Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery: A Narrative Review

M.J. Bos*, W. Buhre, Y. Temel, E.A.J. Joosten, A.R. Absalom, M.L.F. Janssen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

9 Citations (Web of Science)
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Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for patients with various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Clinical improvements rely on careful patient selection and accurate electrode placement. A common method for target localization is intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER). To facilitate MER, DBS surgery is traditionally performed under local or regional anesthesia. However, sedation or general anesthesia is sometimes needed for patients who are unable to tolerate the procedure fully awake because of severe motor symptoms, psychological distress, pain, or other forms of discomfort. The effect of anesthetic drugs on MER is controversial but likely depends on the type and dose of a particular anesthetic agent, underlying disease, and surgical target. In this narrative review, we provide an overview of the current literature on the anesthetic drugs most often used for sedation and anesthesia during DBS surgery, with a focus on their effects on MERs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)300-307
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • anesthesia
  • deep brain stimulation
  • Parkinson disease
  • movement disorders
  • microelectrode recordings
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS STIMULATION
  • GENERAL-ANESTHESIA
  • PARKINSON-DISEASE
  • BASAL GANGLIA
  • AGONIST DEXMEDETOMIDINE
  • PROPOFOL
  • RECEPTORS
  • NEURONS
  • ACTIVATION
  • EXPERIENCE

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