Effect of a 6-week strength-training program on neuromuscular efficiency in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

Samira Shahrjerdi, Farid Bahrpeyma*, Hans H C M Savelberg, Mohammad Reza Mohajeri-Tehrani

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)
108 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The neuromuscular system generates human movement. The functional capacity of the neuromuscular system in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is decreased and this affects the generation of muscle force. Exercise is recommended as an effective treatment in such cases. Short-duration strength training causes neural adaptations in healthy participants, but the effects of strength training on T2DM are unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of strength training on neuromuscular efficiency of lower limb muscles in T2DM.

Methods: Surface electromyograms (SEMG) of the knee flexors and extensors were recorded during isometric contractions. The ratio of peak torque to SEMG amplitude was calculated as neuromuscular efficiency. Measurements were taken before the intervention after 6 weeks of non-training, and after 6 weeks of strength training.

Results: SEMG amplitudes did not differ among the subsequent measurement sessions. Flexor and extensor peak torque increased after the strength-training program. The neuromuscular efficiency of all muscles increased after the 6 weeks of strength training.

Conclusion: A 6-week strength-training program increased the neuromuscular efficiency and peak torque in patients with T2DM; however, the electrical properties of the muscles did not change. These results may be related to increased neural adaptations and motor learning in the early stages of strength training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-382
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetology International
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Muscle strength
  • Surface electromyography
  • Isokinetic
  • MUSCLE STRENGTH
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • EXERCISE
  • ADAPTATIONS
  • DYSFUNCTION
  • MECHANISMS
  • FORCE
  • POWER
  • EMG

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