Early cognitive and emotional outcome after stroke is independent of discharge destination

Jos P L Slenders, Daan P J Verberne, Johanna M A Visser-Meily, Renske M Van den Berg-Vos, Vincent I H Kwa, Caroline M van Heugten

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cognitive and emotional problems occur frequently after stroke. Patients with minor stroke are more likely to be discharged home. This paper compares early cognitive and emotional outcomes in patients discharged home after stroke versus patients discharged to inpatient rehabilitation, and examines the effect of cognitive and emotional outcomes on long-term participation.

METHODS: In this multicenter prospective cohort study, patients with stroke were assessed at two months with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional Consequences following Stroke (CLCE-24) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). One year post stroke, participation was assessed with the Restriction subscale of the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation (USER-P Restriction).

RESULTS: The study included 332 patients. Two months post stroke, anxiety and cognitive problems were equally prevalent among patients discharged home (n = 243; 73%) and patients discharged to inpatient rehabilitation (n = 89; 27%) (HADS-A = 4.8 ± 3.9 versus 4.6 ± 4.0, p = 0.747; MoCA < 26: 66.7% versus 70.8%, p = 0.477; CLCE-cognition = 3.0 ± 2.9 versus 3.3 ± 2.8, p = 0.499). Depressive symptoms were less severe in patients discharged home (HADS-D = 4.3 ± 3.9 versus 5.5 ± 3.8, p = 0.010). In patients discharged home, cognitive complaints were predictive of long-term participation (B = - 2.03; 95% CI - 3.15, - 0.90), while cognitive or emotional outcomes were not predictive in patients discharged to inpatient rehabilitation.

CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive and emotional problems at two months post stroke were comparable between patients discharged home and those discharged to inpatient rehabilitation. For patients discharged home, cognitive complaints were predictive of long-term participation.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Anxiety and depression
  • CARDIAC-ARREST
  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • Cognition
  • FOCUSED FOLLOW-UP
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • METAANALYSIS
  • PARTICIPATION MEASURES
  • Participation
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • REHABILITATION
  • RESPONSIVENESS
  • UTRECHT SCALE
  • VALIDATION
  • stroke

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