Domestic politics, news media and humanitarian intervention: why France and Germany diverged over Libya

J. Bucher, L. Engel, S. Harfensteller, H. Dijkstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1321 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The european union member states split over the military intervention in libya with france, germany and the uk voting differently in the united nations security council. This article compares news media in france and germany to better understand the foreign policy decisions of these key actors. Using a newspaper analysis of 334 articles, it shows that the german domestic debate started very late and was much less stable than the french debate. This supports arguments that germany's decision-making was erratic. The analysis, however, also shows that the german debate was comprehensive and included an extensive discussion of the legitimacy of intervention. This fits in well with the traditional reluctance of german foreign policy elites to support military action.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)524-539
JournalEuropean Security
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online date3 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

@article{4a2a43bb4bb54224b70361504dd0bce2,
title = "Domestic politics, news media and humanitarian intervention: why France and Germany diverged over Libya",
abstract = "The european union member states split over the military intervention in libya with france, germany and the uk voting differently in the united nations security council. This article compares news media in france and germany to better understand the foreign policy decisions of these key actors. Using a newspaper analysis of 334 articles, it shows that the german domestic debate started very late and was much less stable than the french debate. This supports arguments that germany's decision-making was erratic. The analysis, however, also shows that the german debate was comprehensive and included an extensive discussion of the legitimacy of intervention. This fits in well with the traditional reluctance of german foreign policy elites to support military action.",
author = "J. Bucher and L. Engel and S. Harfensteller and H. Dijkstra",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/09662839.2013.766597",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "524--539",
journal = "European Security",
issn = "0966-2839",
publisher = "Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group",
number = "4",

}

Domestic politics, news media and humanitarian intervention: why France and Germany diverged over Libya. / Bucher, J.; Engel, L.; Harfensteller, S.; Dijkstra, H.

In: European Security, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2013, p. 524-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Domestic politics, news media and humanitarian intervention: why France and Germany diverged over Libya

AU - Bucher, J.

AU - Engel, L.

AU - Harfensteller, S.

AU - Dijkstra, H.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - The european union member states split over the military intervention in libya with france, germany and the uk voting differently in the united nations security council. This article compares news media in france and germany to better understand the foreign policy decisions of these key actors. Using a newspaper analysis of 334 articles, it shows that the german domestic debate started very late and was much less stable than the french debate. This supports arguments that germany's decision-making was erratic. The analysis, however, also shows that the german debate was comprehensive and included an extensive discussion of the legitimacy of intervention. This fits in well with the traditional reluctance of german foreign policy elites to support military action.

AB - The european union member states split over the military intervention in libya with france, germany and the uk voting differently in the united nations security council. This article compares news media in france and germany to better understand the foreign policy decisions of these key actors. Using a newspaper analysis of 334 articles, it shows that the german domestic debate started very late and was much less stable than the french debate. This supports arguments that germany's decision-making was erratic. The analysis, however, also shows that the german debate was comprehensive and included an extensive discussion of the legitimacy of intervention. This fits in well with the traditional reluctance of german foreign policy elites to support military action.

U2 - 10.1080/09662839.2013.766597

DO - 10.1080/09662839.2013.766597

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 524

EP - 539

JO - European Security

JF - European Security

SN - 0966-2839

IS - 4

ER -