Does free or lower cost smoking cessation medication stimulate quitting? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands and UK surveys

Floor A. van den Brand*, Gera E. Nagelhout, Karin Hummel, Marc C. Willemsen, Ann McNeill, Onno C. P. van Schayck

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective To investigate whether mentioning free or lower cost smoking cessation medication as a trigger for thinking about quitting is related to higher medication use, more quit attempts and quit success, and whether these associations are modified by education and income.

Methods Data were derived from the 2013 and 2014 surveys of the International Tobacco Control Netherlands (n=1164) and UK (n=768) cohort. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations between mentioning in 2013 that free/lower cost smoking cessation medication was a trigger for thinking about quitting smoking and the use of medication, quit attempts and smoking cessation in 2014.

Results 37.0% of smokers in the UK and 24.9% of smokers in the Netherlands mentioned free/lower cost medication as a trigger for thinking about quitting. Smokers who mentioned this trigger were more likely to have used cessation medication during a quit attempt both in the UK (OR=4.19, p

Conclusion Free/lower cost smoking cessation medication may increase the use of cessation medication and stimulate quit attempts among smokers with low, moderate and high education and income.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S61-S67
Number of pages7
JournalTobacco Control
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • YOUNG-ADULT
  • INEQUALITIES
  • SMOKERS
  • TRENDS
  • PREVALENCE
  • PREDICTORS
  • ABSTINENCE
  • BEHAVIORS
  • MORTALITY
  • COUNTRIES

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