Do you observe what I perceive? The relationship between two perspectives on the ability of people with cognitive impairments to use everyday technology

S. L. Bartels, S. Assander, A-H Patomella, J. Jamnadas-Khoda, C. Malinowsky*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Objectives: Everyday technologies (ETs) can be challenging to use, particularly for older adults with cognitive impairments. This study evaluated the relationship between the self-perceived ability to use ET and observable performance of self-chosen and familiar, but challenging ETs in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia.

Method: A self-perceived report, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ), and a structured observational tool, the Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META), assessing the perceived and observed ability to use ET, were used in 41 people with MCI and 38 people with dementia. Correlations were investigated with non-parametric statistical tests.

Results: In the dementia group, self-perceived report and observational scores correlated on a significant medium level (R-s=0.44, p=0.006). In the MCI group, no significant correlation was found.

Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest the ability of older adults with cognitive impairments to use ETs can be depicted with self-perceived reports as well as with observations. However, the combination of both approaches is recommended to get a comprehensive picture. While the S-ETUQ provides a broad picture of the use, presence and relevance of technologies in an individual's life, the META describes a specific human-technology interaction in detail. Furthermore, the results suggest people with early dementia retain the ability and insight to accurately reflect on their own ability to use ET, emphasizing the need to include their experiences in research and clinical work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1295-1305
Number of pages11
JournalAging & Mental Health
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Everyday technology
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • dementia
  • self-perceived report
  • observation
  • STAGE ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • ACQUIRED BRAIN-INJURY
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION
  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • PERFORMANCE
  • FUTURE
  • AGE
  • PARTICIPATION
  • ANOSOGNOSIA

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