Do Transnational Child-Raising Arrangements Affect Job Outcomes of Migrant Parents? Comparing Angolan Parents in Transnational and NonTransnational Families in the Netherlands

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Transnational family literature has established that parent–child separations affect negatively on the emotional well-being of migrant parents. Less attention has been paid to other effects separation can have on these parents’ lives. Building on insights from transnational family studies and organizational psychology, this article explores the potential link between transnational family life and job outcomes. In particular, two potential negative outcomes are analyzed—job instability and job absenteeism—by comparing Angolan parents whose children live in Angola with Angolans who live with all their children in the Netherlands. Based on mechanisms identified by organizational psychology literature, mediation analysis is conducted. Results indicate that transnational family life increases the times migrant parents change jobs, which is partly mediated by low levels of happiness. Further analyses indicate that especially transnational parents who have limited contact with their children change jobs more often. No significant differences are found with regard to job absenteeism.
Original languageEnglish
Article number10.1177/0192513X17710773
Pages (from-to)1498-1522
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume39
Issue number6
Early online date26 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • transnational families
  • migrant parents
  • job outcomes
  • Angolans
  • the Netherlands
  • INTERGENERATIONAL RELATIONS
  • IMMIGRANT FAMILIES
  • LIFE SATISFACTION
  • PRODUCTIVE WORKER
  • CONFLICT
  • CARE
  • PERFORMANCE
  • MOTHERS
  • MIGRATION
  • BENEFITS

Cite this