Do new ways of working increase work engagement?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the impact of the various facets of new ways of working (NWW) on employee work engagement, taking into account multiple sectors and occupational fields.
Design/methodology/approach
Insights from the literature and the job demands-resources model underpin the hypotheses on how NWW would affect work engagement. The hypotheses were tested using the Preacher and Hayes’ (2008) bootstrap method for multiple mediation and controls, taking into account two potential mediators between (facets of) NWW and work engagement: social interaction in the workplace and transformational leadership.
Findings
The analyses show that three facets of NWW – management of output, access to organizational knowledge, and a freely accessible open workplace – positively affect employees’ work engagement. The latter two facets appear to be fully mediated by social interaction and transformational leadership.
Practical implications
The results imply that firms should foster transformational leadership styles among their line managers, and social interaction in the workplaces, to maximize the positive impact of NWW on work engagement.
Originality/value
This empirical paper draws on a unique data set on the Dutch working population to provide novel insights with a substantial degree of generalizability into the relation between NWW and work engagement, whilst applying a more comprehensive definition of NWW than previously applied, while incorporating two potential mediators.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-534
Number of pages18
JournalPersonnel Review
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • quantitative
  • work engagement
  • new ways of working
  • social interaction
  • transformational leadership (TL)
  • multiple mediation
  • EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT
  • PERFORMANCE
  • Work engagement
  • New ways of working
  • Multiple mediation
  • DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL
  • TELEWORK
  • SATISFACTION
  • JOB DEMANDS
  • Social interaction
  • Transformational leadership (TL)
  • LEADERSHIP
  • Quantitative
  • OUTCOMES
  • COMMUNICATION
  • LIFE

Cite this

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title = "Do new ways of working increase work engagement?",
abstract = "PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the impact of the various facets of new ways of working (NWW) on employee work engagement, taking into account multiple sectors and occupational fields.Design/methodology/approachInsights from the literature and the job demands-resources model underpin the hypotheses on how NWW would affect work engagement. The hypotheses were tested using the Preacher and Hayes’ (2008) bootstrap method for multiple mediation and controls, taking into account two potential mediators between (facets of) NWW and work engagement: social interaction in the workplace and transformational leadership.FindingsThe analyses show that three facets of NWW – management of output, access to organizational knowledge, and a freely accessible open workplace – positively affect employees’ work engagement. The latter two facets appear to be fully mediated by social interaction and transformational leadership.Practical implicationsThe results imply that firms should foster transformational leadership styles among their line managers, and social interaction in the workplaces, to maximize the positive impact of NWW on work engagement.Originality/valueThis empirical paper draws on a unique data set on the Dutch working population to provide novel insights with a substantial degree of generalizability into the relation between NWW and work engagement, whilst applying a more comprehensive definition of NWW than previously applied, while incorporating two potential mediators.",
keywords = "quantitative, work engagement, new ways of working, social interaction, transformational leadership (TL), multiple mediation, EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT, PERFORMANCE, Work engagement, New ways of working, Multiple mediation, DEMANDS-RESOURCES MODEL, TELEWORK, SATISFACTION, JOB DEMANDS, Social interaction, Transformational leadership (TL), LEADERSHIP, Quantitative, OUTCOMES, COMMUNICATION, LIFE",
author = "Ruud Gerards and {de Grip}, Andries and C. Baudewijns",
note = "http://www.rminteractive.nl/panels/",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1108/PR-02-2017-0050",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "517--534",
journal = "Personnel Review",
issn = "0048-3486",
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number = "2",

}

Do new ways of working increase work engagement? / Gerards, Ruud; de Grip, Andries; Baudewijns, C.

In: Personnel Review, Vol. 47, No. 2, 2018, p. 517-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to shed more light on the impact of the various facets of new ways of working (NWW) on employee work engagement, taking into account multiple sectors and occupational fields.Design/methodology/approachInsights from the literature and the job demands-resources model underpin the hypotheses on how NWW would affect work engagement. The hypotheses were tested using the Preacher and Hayes’ (2008) bootstrap method for multiple mediation and controls, taking into account two potential mediators between (facets of) NWW and work engagement: social interaction in the workplace and transformational leadership.FindingsThe analyses show that three facets of NWW – management of output, access to organizational knowledge, and a freely accessible open workplace – positively affect employees’ work engagement. The latter two facets appear to be fully mediated by social interaction and transformational leadership.Practical implicationsThe results imply that firms should foster transformational leadership styles among their line managers, and social interaction in the workplaces, to maximize the positive impact of NWW on work engagement.Originality/valueThis empirical paper draws on a unique data set on the Dutch working population to provide novel insights with a substantial degree of generalizability into the relation between NWW and work engagement, whilst applying a more comprehensive definition of NWW than previously applied, while incorporating two potential mediators.

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