Dimensions of negative thinking and the relations with symptoms of depression and anxiety in children and adolescents.

L.R. J. Rood, S. Bögels, J. Roelofs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The current study sought to examine three forms of negative, repetitive thinking in non-clinical children and adolescents aged between 10 and 18. More specifically, this study addressed the degree to which stress-reactive rumination can be differentiated from other forms of repetitive thinking, such as emotion-focused rumination and worry, and the associations between the various indices of repetitive thinking and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires including measures of stress-reactive rumination, emotion-focused rumination, worry, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results showed that stress-reactive rumination, emotion-focused rumination and worry are related but distinct forms of repetitive negative thinking. Positive associations were found between all indices of repetitive thinking and symptoms of depression and anxiety, but the effects of emotion-focused rumination disappeared when controlling for the other forms of repetitive thinking. The findings are discussed in the light of current theories and previous research, and directions for future research are provided.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-342
Number of pages10
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Keywords

  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • Anxiety
  • COGNITIVE VULNERABILITY
  • DISORDERS
  • Depression
  • NEUROTICISM
  • PARALLEL ANALYSIS
  • RELIABILITY
  • REPETITIVE THOUGHT
  • RESPONSE STYLES THEORY
  • RUMINATION
  • Repetitive thinking
  • Rumination
  • WORRY
  • Worry

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