Differential effects of proteins and carbohydrates on postprandial blood pressure-related responses

K.F.M. Teunissen-Beekman, J. Dopheide, J.M. Geleijnse, S.J.L. Bakker, E.J. Brink, P.W. de Leeuw, J. Serroyen, M.A. van Baak

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Abstract

Diet composition may affect blood pressure (BP), but the mechanisms are unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare postprandial BP-related responses to the ingestion of pea protein, milk protein and egg-white protein. In addition, postprandial BP-related responses to the ingestion of maltodextrin were compared with those to the ingestion of sucrose and a protein mix. We hypothesised that lower postprandial total peripheral resistance (TPR) and BP levels would be accompanied by higher plasma concentrations of nitric oxide, insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucagon. On separate occasions, six meals were tested in a randomised order in forty-eight overweight or obese adults with untreated elevated BP. Postprandial responses of TPR, BP and plasma concentrations of insulin, glucagon, GLP-1 and nitrite, nitroso compounds (RXNO) and S-nitrosothiols (NO x ) were measured for 4 h. No differences were observed in TPR responses. Postprandial BP levels were higher after the ingestion of the egg-white-protein meal than after that of meals containing the other two proteins (P</= 0.01). The ingestion of the pea-protein meal induced the highest NO x response (P</= 0.006). Insulin and glucagon concentrations were lowest after the ingestion of the egg-white-protein meal (P</= 0.009). Postprandial BP levels were lower after the ingestion of the maltodextrin meal than after that of the protein mix and sucrose meals (P</= 0.004), while postprandial insulin concentrations were higher after the ingestion of the maltodextrin meal than after that of the sucrose and protein mix meals after 1-2 h (P</= 0.0001). Postprandial NO x , GLP-1 and glucagon concentrations were lower after the ingestion of the maltodextrin meal than after that of the protein mix meal (P</= 0.008). In conclusion, different protein and carbohydrate sources induce different postprandial BP-related responses, which may be important for BP management. Lower postprandial BP levels are not necessarily accompanied by higher NO x , insulin, glucagon or GLP-1 responses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)600-608
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume112
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Cite this

Teunissen-Beekman, K. F. M., Dopheide, J., Geleijnse, J. M., Bakker, S. J. L., Brink, E. J., de Leeuw, P. W., Serroyen, J., & van Baak, M. A. (2014). Differential effects of proteins and carbohydrates on postprandial blood pressure-related responses. British Journal of Nutrition, 112(4), 600-608. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514001251