Differences in change in coping styles between good responders, moderate responders and non-responders to pulmonary rehabilitation

A. Stoilkova-Hartmann, D.J.A. Janssen, F.M.E. Franssen, E.F.M. Wouters

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves exercise tolerance and health status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data on the effects of PR on coping styles are limited. Aim of the present study was to compare changes in coping styles between patients who had a good, moderate and no improvement in either exercise tolerance or health status after PR. METHODS: Coping styles of 439 COPD patients undergoing PR were assessed by the Utrecht Coping List (UCL) at baseline and after PR. Patients' pulmonary function, six-minute walking distance (6MWD), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D) were recorded. Good, moderate and non-responders were defined on the basis of minimally clinically important difference (MCID) for SGRQ total score and/or 6MWD. RESULTS: Overall, 54.0% of the patients fulfilled the criteria for good responders, while 22.1% were moderate responders. Change in passive reaction pattern coping style differed significantly between good responders and non-responders following PR (p < 0.001). Moreover, within the groups, changes in coping styles after PR occurred among the good responders, whereas the majority of moderate responders' and non-responders' coping styles were not significantly influenced by PR. CONCLUSION: Good responders decreased their passive reaction pattern coping style in contrast to non-responders after PR. In general, PR did not change the coping among moderate and non-responders. Further research is warranted to determine whether including interventions targeting coping styles may modify coping behaviour of COPD patients, as well as improvement in exercise tolerance or health status after PR.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1540-1545
Number of pages6
JournalRespiratory Medicine
Volume109
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Coping styles
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation
  • Exercise tolerance
  • Disease-specific health status
  • Self-management
  • RESPIRATORY SOCIETY STATEMENT
  • MINIMAL IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • DEPRESSION SCALE
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • DISEASE
  • COPD
  • INTERVENTION
  • MANAGEMENT
  • SUCCESS

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