Dietary trans alpha-linolenic acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.

S.H.F. Vermunt - Dongen, B. Beaufrere, R.A. Riemersma, J.L. Sebedio, J.M. Chardigny, R.P. Mensink

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Abstract

: Br J Nutr 2001 Mar;85(3):387-92 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut


Comment in:
Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):249-50.

Dietary trans alpha-linolenic acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.

Vermunt SH, Beaufrere B, Riemersma RA, Sebedio JL, Chardigny JM, Mensink RP, TransLinE Investigators a.

Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

TRANS: isomers of alpha-linolenic acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans alpha-linolenic acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans alpha-linolenic acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils 'free' of trans fatty acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils 'high' or 'low' in trans alpha-linolenic acid. Daily total trans alpha-linolenic acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans alpha-linolenic acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans alpha-linolenic acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-392
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume85
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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